Disney Movies & Facts

disneyhumans:

Escape To Witch Mountain, 1975

disneyhumans:

Escape To Witch Mountain, 1975


Tia Malone: Tony, what should I put after “sports”?

Tony Malone: Put, “spectator.”

Tia Malone: Tony, what should I put after “sports”?

Tony Malone: Put, “spectator.”

posted 2 hours ago with 5 notes

It’s Quote Thursday!

So quotes, gifs, and screencaps from both movies will be posted today!

posted 4 hours ago with 1 note







It’s Face Character Wednesday!

But since there are no characters for these movies in the parks and I had trouble finding inspired looks from these characters, enjoy some premiere pictures from these movies!

posted 1 day ago with 2 notes

Beyond Witch Mountain (1982) is the second sequel to the 1975 Disney film Escape to Witch Mountain. Although Eddie Albert returned to play Jason O’Day from the original 1975 movie, the parts of Tony and Tia were recast with actors comparable only in age to Ike Eisenmann and Kim Richards when they first played the parts. Tracey Gold from “Growing Pains” played Tia. The parts of Aristotle Bolt, Lucas Deranian and Uncle Bené were also recast.
It was originally intended to be the pilot for a television series, but no networks thought that viewers would take the show seriously, and so a second episode was never made.
The film also contradicts the 1978 sequel Return from Witch Mountain because in that film, Tia and Tony are of teenage years, because Uncle Bené is still alive, and because in both of the original movies, Tony had to answer Tia verbally. He didn’t have the power to talk through his mind. In “Beyond Witch Mountain”, Tia and Tony are around the same age from the first movie, Uncle Bené dies early in the film, and as previously mentioned, Tony can talk to Tia mentally.

Beyond Witch Mountain (1982) is the second sequel to the 1975 Disney film Escape to Witch Mountain. Although Eddie Albert returned to play Jason O’Day from the original 1975 movie, the parts of Tony and Tia were recast with actors comparable only in age to Ike Eisenmann and Kim Richards when they first played the parts. Tracey Gold from “Growing Pains” played Tia. The parts of Aristotle Bolt, Lucas Deranian and Uncle Bené were also recast.

It was originally intended to be the pilot for a television series, but no networks thought that viewers would take the show seriously, and so a second episode was never made.

The film also contradicts the 1978 sequel Return from Witch Mountain because in that film, Tia and Tony are of teenage years, because Uncle Bené is still alive, and because in both of the original movies, Tony had to answer Tia verbally. He didn’t have the power to talk through his mind. In “Beyond Witch Mountain”, Tia and Tony are around the same age from the first movie, Uncle Bené dies early in the film, and as previously mentioned, Tony can talk to Tia mentally.

posted 1 day ago with 9 notes

Return from Witch Mountain is the 1978 sequel to Walt Disney Productions' 1975 film, Escape to Witch Mountain. It was written by Malcolm Marmorstein and is based on the novel by Alexander Key. Ike Eisenmann, Kim Richards, and Denver Pyle reprise their roles as Tony, Tia, and Uncle Bené—humanoid extraterrestrials with special powers including telepathy and telekinesis. The two main villains are played by Bette Davis as Letha Wedge, a greedy woman using the last of her money to finance the scientific experiments of Dr. Victor Gannon, played by Christopher Lee.

Return from Witch Mountain is the 1978 sequel to Walt Disney Productions' 1975 film, Escape to Witch Mountain. It was written by Malcolm Marmorstein and is based on the novel by Alexander KeyIke EisenmannKim Richards, and Denver Pyle reprise their roles as Tony, Tia, and Uncle Bené—humanoid extraterrestrials with special powers including telepathy and telekinesis. The two main villains are played by Bette Davis as Letha Wedge, a greedy woman using the last of her money to finance the scientific experiments of Dr. Victor Gannon, played by Christopher Lee.

posted 1 day ago with 7 notes

Despite the mixed reviews, Race to Witch Mountain turned out to be a box office hit. It became the first Disney film in 2009 to open at #1, grossing $24.4 million. The film would go on to gross over $67 million at the North American domestic box office, and over $39 million internationally, for a total of $106 million.

Despite the mixed reviews, Race to Witch Mountain turned out to be a box office hit. It became the first Disney film in 2009 to open at #1, grossing $24.4 million. The film would go on to gross over $67 million at the North American domestic box office, and over $39 million internationally, for a total of $106 million.

posted 1 day ago with 11 notes

The convention center in Pomona, California was converted into Race to Witch Mountain's UFO Expo 9, and the interior of Witch Mountain was designed using photographs from a tour of NORAD's Cheyenne Mountain. A cabin for the story was also built in Agua Dulce, California. The director sought assistance from UFO experts, the military, and CIA advisers to shape the elements of the film. He also introduced a new element in the remake, an extraterrestrial creature called Siphon. The creature was conceived by the design team who created the looks for Alien and Predator in the film Alien vs Predator.

The convention center in Pomona, California was converted into Race to Witch Mountain's UFO Expo 9, and the interior of Witch Mountain was designed using photographs from a tour of NORAD's Cheyenne Mountain. A cabin for the story was also built in Agua Dulce, California. The director sought assistance from UFO experts, the military, and CIA advisers to shape the elements of the film. He also introduced a new element in the remake, an extraterrestrial creature called Siphon. The creature was conceived by the design team who created the looks for Alien and Predator in the film Alien vs Predator.

posted 1 day ago with 8 notes

In July 2007, Walt Disney Pictures hired Andy Fickman to direct Witch Mountain, a “modern re-imagining” of Escape to Witch Mountain, using a script by Matt Lopez. The following August, Dwayne Johnson (most notably famous for portraying The Rock in the WWE) was cast into a lead role, with filming scheduled to begin in March 2008. Fickman did not describe the film as a remake, defining his production as “a new chapter within the world of Witch Mountain”. The director also described the book, in which the films are based as “a very cool dark thriller” and anticipated drawing elements from it that did not exist in the 1975 film. By March 2008, filmmakers were using a new script written by Mark Bomback. The film was re-titled Race to Witch Mountain, and it began filming in Los Angeles in the same month.

In July 2007, Walt Disney Pictures hired Andy Fickman to direct Witch Mountain, a “modern re-imagining” of Escape to Witch Mountain, using a script by Matt Lopez. The following August, Dwayne Johnson (most notably famous for portraying The Rock in the WWE) was cast into a lead role, with filming scheduled to begin in March 2008. Fickman did not describe the film as a remake, defining his production as “a new chapter within the world of Witch Mountain”. The director also described the book, in which the films are based as “a very cool dark thriller” and anticipated drawing elements from it that did not exist in the 1975 film. By March 2008, filmmakers were using a new script written by Mark Bomback. The film was re-titled Race to Witch Mountain, and it began filming in Los Angeles in the same month.

posted 2 days ago with 12 notes