Disney Movies & Facts

Co-producer Douglas Gresham's voice is heard early in The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, The Witch, and the Wardrobe, as a radio announcer giving news of the German bombings in London. Gresham is C.S. Lewis's stepson, and the executor of Lewis's estate, who manages the rights to the “Narnia” books. He is one of the sons of the American poet Joy Gresham, Lewis's wife, but the only one depicted in the autobiographical 1993 movie Shadowlands.

Co-producer Douglas Gresham's voice is heard early in The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, The Witch, and the Wardrobe, as a radio announcer giving news of the German bombings in London. Gresham is C.S. Lewis's stepson, and the executor of Lewis's estate, who manages the rights to the “Narnia” books. He is one of the sons of the American poet Joy Gresham, Lewis's wife, but the only one depicted in the autobiographical 1993 movie Shadowlands.

posted 1 hour ago with 13 notes

When Peter is talking to Aslan in The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, The Witch, and the Wardrobe, Aslan says “Beaver also mentioned something about you turning him into a hat”. That line was not originally in the movie. The smile you see is William Moseley smiling because a fly was buzzing around his head, which rendered the shot useless.

When Peter is talking to Aslan in The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, The Witch, and the Wardrobe, Aslan says “Beaver also mentioned something about you turning him into a hat”. That line was not originally in the movie. The smile you see is William Moseley smiling because a fly was buzzing around his head, which rendered the shot useless.

posted 2 hours ago with 63 notes

empress-of-the-lone-islands asked: "Yay!!!!!!!!!!!!!! I have waited so long for this week! I feel like this series is overlooked as being Disney, thanks for giving it the spotlight for a week! Also, Jadis is my favorite Disney villain :D"

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She is pretty BA. We’ll have some fun highlighting her this week! ^_^

posted 3 hours ago with 13 notes

Aslan is a Turkish word (as used in The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, The Witch, and the Wardrobe) meaning Lion. Lewis came up with the name during a trip to Turkey before 1922, where he saw the Sultan’s elite guards, called Aslan because of their bravery and loyalty. The name of the White Witch is “Jadis,” a French word meaning “of old.” Aslan explains that the witch practices the very old “deep magic,” but his “magic” is even older—from “before the dawn of time.” “Jadis” is the usual start to French fairy tales (much like the English phrase “Once upon a time…”).

Aslan is a Turkish word (as used in The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, The Witch, and the Wardrobe) meaning Lion. Lewis came up with the name during a trip to Turkey before 1922, where he saw the Sultan’s elite guards, called Aslan because of their bravery and loyalty. The name of the White Witch is “Jadis,” a French word meaning “of old.” Aslan explains that the witch practices the very old “deep magic,” but his “magic” is even older—from “before the dawn of time.” “Jadis” is the usual start to French fairy tales (much like the English phrase “Once upon a time…”).

posted 4 hours ago with 115 notes

While filming the snowball fight scene in The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, The Witch and the Wardrobe, the four kids had a snowball fight with director Andrew Adamson between takes.

While filming the snowball fight scene in The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, The Witch and the Wardrobe, the four kids had a snowball fight with director Andrew Adamson between takes.

posted 5 hours ago with 57 notes

In scenes where the children had to react or talk to CG characters in The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, The Witch and the Wardrobe, Andrew Adamson, the director, and Alina Phelan, his assistant, would provide the voices for those non-existing characters, to make it easier for the kids to respond to someone who really isn’t there.

In scenes where the children had to react or talk to CG characters in The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, The Witch and the WardrobeAndrew Adamson, the director, and Alina Phelan, his assistant, would provide the voices for those non-existing characters, to make it easier for the kids to respond to someone who really isn’t there.

posted 6 hours ago with 65 notes

anidey asked: "I absolutely adore the Chronicles of Narnia. The first time I went to the cinema watching "The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe" I didn't know what this movie was about. I just wanted to see a fantasy movie. But then I was so amazed by the story, the characters, the scenery, everything. Since then I'm a huge Narnia fan. Thank you so much for doing it this week! :)"

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It’s got a little bit of everything in it and I think that’s what makes so wonderful!

posted 7 hours ago with 15 notes

The Witch’s coachman is unnamed in the book. The filmmakers of The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, The Witch and the Wardrobe named him Ginaarbrik, deciding that he is an ancestor of Nikabrik from The Chronicles of Narnia: Prince Caspian. The two dwarves wear the same family ring in the films.

The Witch’s coachman is unnamed in the book. The filmmakers of The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, The Witch and the Wardrobe named him Ginaarbrik, deciding that he is an ancestor of Nikabrik from The Chronicles of Narnia: Prince Caspian. The two dwarves wear the same family ring in the films.

posted 9 hours ago with 57 notes

Several birds had made nests within the filming studio of The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, The Witch and the Wardrobe, and several scenes had to be filmed twice due to the noise these birds were making. A green screen was used to film one of these birds who leads the children from Tumnus’s house to the Beavers.

Several birds had made nests within the filming studio of The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, The Witch and the Wardrobe, and several scenes had to be filmed twice due to the noise these birds were making. A green screen was used to film one of these birds who leads the children from Tumnus’s house to the Beavers.

posted 10 hours ago with 54 notes

In The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, The Witch, and the Wardrobe, there are three versions of Peter’s sword: steel, aluminum, and rubber. William Moseley preferred working with the aluminum swords for the fighting scenes because they were a lot lighter and “they didn’t bounce like the rubber swords.”

In The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, The Witch, and the Wardrobe, there are three versions of Peter’s sword: steel, aluminum, and rubber. William Moseley preferred working with the aluminum swords for the fighting scenes because they were a lot lighter and “they didn’t bounce like the rubber swords.”

posted 11 hours ago with 49 notes

anythin-n-everythin asked: "I got to go to the London premiere of The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe. It was awesome seeing all the stars walking the red carpet! The scene when Aslan is on the stone table still scares me now!"

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That is such a cool opportunity to see all the stars! And I agree, I always have to look away during that scene. 

posted 12 hours ago with 17 notes

Georgie Henley is the principal actress in the role of Lucy in The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, The Witch, and the Wardrobe. Near the end of the film, her older sister Rachael Henley (seen on the right) plays her grown-up alter ego. Early in the film, when Mr. Tumnus refers to Lucy as a “Daughter of Eve”, a confused Lucy says her mother’s name is Helen, who is the mother of the two actresses.

Georgie Henley is the principal actress in the role of Lucy in The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, The Witch, and the Wardrobe. Near the end of the film, her older sister Rachael Henley (seen on the right) plays her grown-up alter ego. Early in the film, when Mr. Tumnus refers to Lucy as a “Daughter of Eve”, a confused Lucy says her mother’s name is Helen, who is the mother of the two actresses.

posted 14 hours ago with 81 notes

The fur around the White Witch’s neck during the final battle scene in The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, The Witch, and the Wardrobe is Aslan’s mane that was cut off the night before. In the same scene she fights Florentine style with two swords.

The fur around the White Witch’s neck during the final battle scene in The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, The Witch, and the Wardrobe is Aslan’s mane that was cut off the night before. In the same scene she fights Florentine style with two swords.

posted 15 hours ago with 65 notes

Although C.S. Lewis wrote “The Lion, The Witch, and the Wardrobe” first, it is actually chronologically the second book of “The Chronicles of Narnia.”

Although C.S. Lewis wrote “The Lion, The Witch, and the Wardrobe” first, it is actually chronologically the second book of “The Chronicles of Narnia.”

posted 16 hours ago with 71 notes

You’re very welcome! It’s going to be fun! These movies give me a lot to work with!

You’re very welcome! It’s going to be fun! These movies give me a lot to work with!

posted 18 hours ago with 21 notes